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Talk about the different aspects of your tow car and tow advice.

Allwheel Drive v Conventioal 4x4

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17 May 2017 @ 08:05:37 am
Graham
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How does the all wheel drive compare to the conventional 4x4 considering no low range or diff lock. How would it compare in heavy sand eg Tembe or Kosi Bay
Anyone have a Amorok as a towing vehicle, would it handle a Penta
Thanks
Graham Strachan
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17 May 2017 @ 10:09:29 am
Campervan
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Hi Graham,
Normally I would say that it cannot compare, as,
You cannot compare no low range, to a vehicle with low range.
Trying to pull away on an incline, or steep incline, or thick sand without low range would be problematic, however,
You considering an Amarok, this vehicle with the eight speed gearbox is what we spoke about around camp fires fifteen years ago.
Their gearbox is ratio'ed in such a way that it covers the lower ratio gears, inbetween the higher ratio gears.
Though I do not know these vehicles, the concept is good, but,
I prefer a bigger diesel engine for a longer lifespan vehicle.
I just do not believe that a smaller hard working diesel can outlast a bigger engine that does not need to work as hard.
I also think that having a vehicle with better capabilities, enables you to go to a bigger variety of places, than just an all wheel drive vehicle.
Ultimately, you need to buy what you like and what you will be proud of driving. If anything goes wrong, it must be your choice, not mine or anyone elses choice.
Happy hunting and do keep us informed on your choice,
You WILL get a varied response, as we all differ in our preferances.
On The Road Again
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17 May 2017 @ 13:25:09 pm
Nabro
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The latest Car magazine has a comparative test between several 4X4 D/C auto bakkies. This include a towing test in which the Amarok came second last. I am not down playing the Amarok, after all it was the overall winner. It might be worthwhile to read the test though.
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17 May 2017 @ 13:58:33 pm
OOM JEEP
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My Grand Cherokee het n "diff lock /low range " verstelling en hy is n all wheel drive.
Ons het dit al gebruik in droΓ« dik los sand tot groot tevredenheid. Maar eks nie n ou wat in daardie toestande speel of ry nie. Dit was een keer so drie jaar terug.
I love camping all year round
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17 May 2017 @ 15:44:11 pm
Graham
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Thanks guys for your response, I realize there is no wrong or right answer, is a personal thing. Am very happy with my present reliable Isuzu." Boys and their toys"
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17 May 2017 @ 15:55:10 pm
Grumpy/Hannes
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Graham

You do get difflock on the Amarok as an optional extra and I suppose lot of bucks extra.

To me all wheel drive is a waste, more expensive on fuel, works fantastic in the rain,(doesn't rain every day) and eats up tyres on tar roads. 

My Suzi is very popular overseas in countries with lots of snow. 

Will let you know what it does when it snow in PolokwaneπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

At last !!!!
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17 May 2017 @ 16:49:58 pm
Graham
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Thanks Grumpy/Hannes. Ek hoor jou!!
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17 May 2017 @ 17:33:32 pm
snys
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I had a discussion witha 4x4 instructor about this and he informed me that the all wheel drive only "grips" when the vehicle slips. According to the instructor, all wheel drive is only for non slip purposes and not for off-road.

 

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17 May 2017 @ 20:11:31 pm
Danie-SLK
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I think 4x4 is still the answer for difficult conditions. Many tests on the internet of all wheel drives where the brain does not allow the power to the wheels that need is. The system is only as good as the algoriths. How would anyone knows it will work when needed?
That is how I understood it by looking at the videos.
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18 May 2017 @ 07:16:23 am
Cabs
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Hi there,

I bought a Hyundai Tucson when they first cam out. The 2.2 CRDI AWD. I had it on the beach in Mozambic and the only thing I had to do was swith off the traction control, because as soon as we hit the DEEP sand the traction control wanted to take over. Once it was switched off there was no problem. Never got stuck at all. Took it off road a few times, over rocky areas and similarly never got stuck. About a year ago a friend of mine took me off roading in his Kia Sorento 2.2 CRDI AWD, and we went HEAVY 4x4ing, over big rocks and through very tricky areas and we never got stuck once. The only limitation was the ground clearence. I am in no way saying that the AWD's are as good as the full out 4x4's however dont under estimate the AWD's capabilities.

My R2 worth....

Groete
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18 May 2017 @ 10:18:00 am
Campervan
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Marco,
No one is underestimating AWD,
The AWD is obviously better than 4x2 or 4x2 with diff-lock.
The big difference will come in when the sand is thick or when you are towing a heavy van in thick sand or need to get up a hill without a run up. Getting over rocks with a light vehicle is easy. With a heavy caravan in tow is a different kettle of fish.
A 4x4 with low range will get you to most places you could want to go, without going extreme and will mostly get you out of an extreme place you may find yourself in.
We were in Damaraland on a track following lion spoor. There were sections of soft sands, but most were negotiated in 4x2. On a relative flat piece of ground we drove into a section of sand which was no different from any other around us. We were on a very slight down hill. We lost power and I changed down. Still no power so engaged 4x4H, but the vehicle stalled.
I tried reversing but with no power, the vehicle just stalled again.
Engage 4x4L-range, reverse a few metres back and then forward again and drove until we got out a few kilometres, when I found another harder track.
On this track we drove until the track disappeared down a canyon, which needed careful driving with low range and plenty of brake pedal to avoid sliding down the face of the canyon. Two ways out of the canyon, were up a dune or out a steep track on other side of canyon. Not do-able without low range
Without L-range I would not have got out the Ugab River or the next canyon. We mostly travel alone, so have no back up. We do not look for extreme routes, as we have no back up if things were to go wrong. We are pensioners and not good at pushing a 2.5 ton vehicle in thick sand. We are also not good with a spade/shovel.
All I am trying to portray is that when driving off the beaten track, these things can happen. You don't need to look for trouble, it will find you. The further you go off the beaten track, the further you will WANT to go. Having the right equipment will go a long way in making you self sufficient. Starting with the right equipment wil be cheaper than selling the wrong equipment to buy the right equipment.
People start off doing the tar roads and gravel travel, then WANT to get to see the places less travelled over the next mountain.
You only have one life, go out there and live it.
Happy and safe travels...
On The Road Again
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18 May 2017 @ 13:52:08 pm
Graham
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Thanks everyone interesting topic and answers.Probably stick with what I know" if it aint broke do not fix it"
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25 Jun 2017 @ 20:17:03 pm
Barracuda
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Hi Guys. I am new to the forum but like to give an answer to your question. I drive an Amarok auto as per your question. We tow a big super duck ski boat and a sprite splas caravan. I launch the duck at Sodwana and at Barra in Moz with no hassels. It tows extremely well and is the most stable towing vechical I owned and that include a 4.8 Patrol station wagon. The things you need to look out for is its revers gear ratio is not up to standard and it is more expensive on fuel, but I pay the fuel bill happely with the added safety of the permanent 4x4. The Amarok is also a permanent 4x4 with an open diff and not a awd system as stated and it comes standard with a difflock. The Amarok is definately able to do what you will ask of it. Hope this will help answer your question.
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26 Jun 2017 @ 10:43:11 am
Fred
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I think first of all you have to use any tool for the purpose it was intended for.  In this vein an AWD was not designed as a 4X4 and if you try and use it as such, you are going to break it.  The lack of low range is one of the most limiting factors in an AWD which makes it unsuitable to for instance climb rocks.  On the other hand, if the sandy terrain is such that the AWD can travel without having to slip tyhe clutch in say 1st gear, it is no less capable than a real 4X4 and probably even more so as they tend to be lighter.  Some of the real 4X4's actually use similiar systems as an AWD instead of diff locks on wheels.  But they are not made to do this much as they are at most gravel roaders.

One must remember AWD was actually created to provide exceptional roadholding capability and making use of this for light off road work is just a side benefit, not the purpose of the system.

As for the durability of small engines, I think you can today create materials, especially metal, to be as durable as you need it to be.   I do not ascribe to the theory that a bigger engine labours less than a smaller engine with the same output.  The smaller engine probably has more strenght where it is needed because it is designed to handle it.

Het is beter rijk te leven dan rijk te sterven
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